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Blog | Foot Doctor Brunswick, ME 04011, Damariscotta, ME 04543 and Augusta, ME 04330

Tuesday, 22 September 2020 00:00

Why Live with Pain and Numbness in Your Feet?

Suffering from this type of pain? You may have the foot condition known as Morton's neuroma. Morton's neuroma may develop as a result of ill-fitting footwear and existing foot deformities. We can help.

Monday, 21 September 2020 00:00

Are Plantar Warts Contagious?

Plantar warts are warts that develop on the bottom of the feet. These warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), a contagious virus that infects the top layer of skin. HPV typically enters the body through broken skin, and warts are spread through direct contact with the virus. Sharing personal items that can harbor the virus, such as towels, shoes, socks, and razors can cause an infection. If you already have a wart, you can also reinfect yourself by touching the wart and then touching another part of your body. Warts often take months to develop after you have come in contact with HPV, so it is important to prevent HPV infections in the first place. Some prevention strategies include not sharing personal items, keeping the feet dry, and wearing shoes when walking through public areas or on warm, moist surfaces, like those at a public swimming pool. For more information about plantar warts, consult with a podiatrist.  

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact one of our podiatrists from Foot & Ankle Associates of Maine. Our doctors will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brunswick, Damariscotta, Augusta, ME. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Warts
Monday, 14 September 2020 00:00

There Are Two Types of Corns

A small area of thickened skin on the bottom of the foot may indicate a hard corn. It generally develops as a result of excess friction that can come from wearing shoes and socks that do not fit correctly. A corn can form between the toes, and this is referred to as a soft corn. It can be quite painful, and it may feel better to wear a corn pad over the affected area. This can help the corn to gradually reduce in size, and mild relief may be felt when larger size shoes are worn, as they can diminish excess friction. For corns that are severe, salicylic acid may be applied to the affected area, and the corn will eventually be removed. Corns can be quite bothersome, and if you are afflicted with hard or soft corns, it is recommended that you consult with a podiatrist.

If you have any concerns regarding your feet and ankles, contact one of our podiatrists of Foot & Ankle Associates of Maine. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? and How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns can be described as areas of the skin that have thickened to the point of becoming painful or irritating. They are often layers and layers of the skin that have become dry and rough, and are normally smaller than calluses.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as wearing:

  • Well-fitting socks
  • Comfortable shoes that are not tight around your foot
  • Shoes that offer support

Treating Corns
Treatment of corns involves removing the dead skin that has built up in the specific area of the foot. Consult with Our doctors to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brunswick, Damariscotta, Augusta, ME. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Everything You Need to Know About Corns
Tuesday, 08 September 2020 00:00

Common Reasons for Ankle Pain

Your ankle can hurt for a variety of reasons. The most common cause of ankle pain is an injury, such as a strain or a sprain. A strain is an injury to the muscle or tendon of the ankle, while a sprain is an injury to the ligament. Both types of injuries can vary in severity and may cause pain or discomfort, tenderness, and swelling. Other possible injuries of the ankle include Achilles tendon ruptures or ankle fractures, which are more severe in nature. Several types of arthritis can affect the ankle, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and gout. An infection, in which bacteria enters the skin or the joint around the ankle can cause pain and swelling, in addition to fever and fatigue. Flat feet or fallen arches may lead to ankle pain as well. If you are experiencing ankle pain, it is recommended that you see a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and to begin the best course of treatment that is right for you. 

Ankle pain can be caused by a number of problems and may be potentially serious. If you have ankle pain, consult with one of our podiatrists from Foot & Ankle Associates of Maine. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Ankle pain is any condition that causes pain in the ankle. Due to the fact that the ankle consists of tendons, muscles, bones, and ligaments, ankle pain can come from a number of different conditions.

Causes

The most common causes of ankle pain include:

  • Types of arthritis (rheumatoid, osteoarthritis, and gout)
  • Ankle sprains
  • Broken ankles
  • Achilles tendinitis
  • Achilles tendon rupture
  • Stress fractures
  • Bursitis
  • Tarsal tunnel syndrome
  • Plantar fasciitis

Symptoms

Symptoms of ankle injury vary based upon the condition. Pain may include general pain and discomfort, swelling, aching, redness, bruising, burning or stabbing sensations, and/or loss of sensation.

Diagnosis

Due to the wide variety of potential causes of ankle pain, podiatrists will utilize a number of different methods to properly diagnose ankle pain. This can include asking for personal and family medical histories and of any recent injuries. Further diagnosis may include sensation tests, a physical examination, and potentially x-rays or other imaging tests.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are rest, ice packs, keeping pressure off the foot, orthotics and braces, medication for inflammation and pain, and surgery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brunswick, Damariscotta, Augusta, ME. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Ankle Pain
Monday, 31 August 2020 00:00

What Causes Flat Feet?

Flat feet occur when the arch of the foot is lower than normal or nonexistent. Because flat feet change how the feet and legs align, they can cause pain in the heel, arches of the feet, or the legs. One cause of flat feet occurs when the feet do not develop correctly during childhood. Most children develop a visible arch in their feet by around age 10, but in some cases, the arch never develops. While this occurs regularly and is not a big issue, flat feet can also develop with age. Risk factors for developing flat feet include injuries, arthritis, diabetes, or obesity. Signs of flat feet include shoes that don’t wear out evenly, pain in the feet and legs, or weakened feet. If you are suffering from the signs of flat feet, it is important to consult with a podiatrist to discuss proper treatment options. These may include orthotics, special stretches or a weight loss strategy.  

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact one of our podiatrists from Foot & Ankle Associates of Maine. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms

  • Pain around the heel or arch area
  • Trouble standing on the tip toe
  • Swelling around the inside of the ankle
  • Flat look to one or both feet
  • Having your shoes feel uneven when worn

Treatment

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brunswick, Damariscotta, Augusta, ME. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Flat Feet
Monday, 24 August 2020 00:00

Achilles Tendonitis: An Overview

If you play a sport or follow sports news, then you have likely heard of Achilles tendon injuries. Achilles tendonitis is extremely common among athletes, although anyone can incur an Achilles tendon injury. This type of injury stems from overuse. When the calf muscles that connect the heel bone to the Achilles tendon are overloaded, the tendon can become swollen, painful, and tender to the touch. The most common symptom is pain at the back of the calf. Treatment involves at-home care, such as rest and taking anti-inflammatory drugs, under the supervision of your doctor. If you have an Achilles tendon injury, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist as soon as possible.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact one of our podiatrists of Foot & Ankle Associates of Maine. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brunswick, Damariscotta, Augusta, ME. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What are Achilles Tendon Injuries
Sunday, 23 August 2020 00:00

Do Your Child's Feet Hurt?

Have your child's feet been examined lately? Healthy feet are happy feet. If your child is complaining of foot pain, it may be a sign of underlying problems.

Athletes, or those who regularly partake in sporting activities may run the risk of getting a foot or lower extremity injury. One common sports injury is known as a stress fracture. Stress fractures can occur due to overuse, or repetitive actions that may cause strain for the body and create a small crack in the bone. To help prevent this type of injury, it’s important to make sure that you use the proper equipment and footwear when training. Getting proper nutrition and slowly increasing the difficulty of your training are important factors in maintaining a healthy exercise routine, as well as in preventing overuse. For more advice on how to prevent sports injuries like stress fractures, please consult with a podiatrist.

Sports related foot and ankle injuries require proper treatment before players can go back to their regular routines. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists of Foot & Ankle Associates of Maine. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries

Foot and ankle injuries are a common occurrence when it comes to athletes of any sport. While many athletes dismiss the initial aches and pains, the truth is that ignoring potential foot and ankle injuries can lead to serious problems. As athletes continue to place pressure and strain the area further, a mild injury can turn into something as serious as a rupture and may lead to a permanent disability. There are many factors that contribute to sports related foot and ankle injuries, which include failure to warm up properly, not providing support or wearing bad footwear. Common injuries and conditions athletes face, including:

  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Plantar Fasciosis
  • Achilles Tendinitis
  • Achilles Tendon Rupture
  • Ankle Sprains

Sports related injuries are commonly treated using the RICE method. This includes rest, applying ice to the injured area, compression and elevating the ankle. More serious sprains and injuries may require surgery, which could include arthroscopic and reconstructive surgery. Rehabilitation and therapy may also be required in order to get any recovering athlete to become fully functional again. Any unusual aches and pains an athlete sustains must be evaluated by a licensed, reputable medical professional.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brunswick, Damariscotta, Augusta, ME. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries

Retaining fluid and swelling in your feet is extremely common during pregnancy. The swelling may be especially noticeable at the end of the day, during hot weather, or after standing for long periods of time. There are several things that you can do at home that may bring you mild relief. Resting and elevating your feet for at least 20 minutes at the end of the day may help reduce swelling. Eating a balanced diet with less salt and drinking plenty of water is suggested to reduce excessive fluid retention. Gentle, regular exercise and wearing wide, supportive shoes can make you more comfortable as well. For more information on how to deal with fluid retention and swelling in your feet during pregnancy, consult with a podiatrist.

Pregnant women with swollen feet can be treated with a variety of different methods that are readily available. For more information about other cures for swollen feet during pregnancy, consult with one of our podiatrists from Foot & Ankle Associates of Maine. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs.

What Foot Problems Can Arise During Pregnancy?

One problem that can occur is overpronation, which occurs when the arch of the foot flattens and tends to roll inward.  This can cause pain and discomfort in your heels while you’re walking or even just standing up, trying to support your baby.  

Another problem is edema, or swelling in the extremities. This often affects the feet during pregnancy but tends to occur in the later stages. 

How Can I Keep My Feet Healthy During Pregnancy?

  • Wearing orthotics can provide extra support for the feet and help distribute weight evenly
  • Minimize the amount of time spent walking barefoot
  • Wear shoes with good arch support
  • Wear shoes that allow for good circulation to the feet
  • Elevate feet if you experience swelling
  • Massage your feet
  • Get regular, light exercise, such as walking, to promote blood circulation to the feet

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brunswick, Damariscotta, Augusta, ME. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Foot Care for Pregnant Women

Patients who have pain between the toes may be experiencing a condition that is referred to as Morton’s neuroma. This condition is a result of a compressed nerve and can be caused by wearing shoes that do not fit properly. Additionally, it may occur from participating in sporting activities such as running and dancing. Some patients have a foot structure that can lead to developing this ailment, and existing foot conditions including hammertoes and bunions may contribute to the onset of Morton’s neuroma. The pain and discomfort can range from a tingling to a burning sensation, and can radiate to the ball of the foot. If you have pain in this part of your foot, it is strongly recommended that you schedule a consultation with a podiatrist who can properly diagnose and treat this condition.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact one of our podiatrists of Foot & Ankle Associates of Maine. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brunswick, Damariscotta, Augusta, ME. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Morton's Neuroma
Monday, 27 July 2020 00:00

How to Prevent Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s Foot is a common fungal infection of the foot. The fungus that causes athlete’s foot, known as the tinea fungus, thrives in dark, warm, moist environments. This makes areas that are often tightly covered and sweaty, like your feet, a perfect breeding ground for tinea fungus. To prevent athlete’s foot, it’s important to keep your feet as dry as you can. Avoiding wearing tightly-fitted shoes, which can trap moisture, and frequently changing your socks can also help in the prevention of athlete’s foot. If possible, wear open-toed sandals, which will allow more air to circulate to your feet and decrease sweating. Open-toed sandals also have the added benefit of exposing your feet to sunlight, which helps slow the growth of the fungus. If you suspect that you may have athlete’s foot, consult with a podiatrist who can diagnose and treat the problem. 

Athlete’s foot is an inconvenient condition that can be easily reduced with the proper treatment. If you have any concerns about your feet and ankles, contact one of our podiatrists from Foot & Ankle Associates of Maine.  Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be an extremely contagious foot infection. It is commonly contracted in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools, or anywhere your feet often come into contact with other people.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

  • Hydrate your feet by using lotion
  • Exfoliate
  • Buff off nails
  • Use of anti-fungal products
  • Examine your feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts develop

Athlete’s foot can cause many irritating symptoms such as dry and flaking skin, itching, and redness. Some more severe symptoms can include bleeding and cracked skin, intense itching and burning, and even pain when walking. In the worst cases, Athlete’s foot can cause blistering as well. Speak to your podiatrist for a better understanding of the different causes of Athlete’s foot, as well as help in determining which treatment options are best for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brunswick, Damariscotta, Augusta, ME. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Athlete's Foot
Friday, 24 July 2020 00:00

It's Time for Beautiful Feet

You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails. Step outside without worrying about the appearance of your feet.

Peripheral neuropathy, which can cause weakness, numbness, and pain in your feet, might make you reluctant to exercise. However, there is scientific evidence that you can benefit from physical activity. Researchers have found that exercising can improve balance, strength, and walking speed, reduce neuropathic pain and sensory disturbances, and improve mobility and confidence in patients with peripheral neuropathy. Doctors recommend that patients with peripheral neuropathy engage in flexibility, endurance, strength, and balance exercises to get maximum results. A podiatrist can help you maintain an active and healthy lifestyle by providing treatments to slow the progression of the disease, decrease your pain, and maintain the health of your feet.

Neuropathy

Neuropathy can be a potentially serious condition, especially if it is left undiagnosed. If you have any concerns that you may be experiencing nerve loss in your feet, consult with one of our podiatrists from Foot & Ankle Associates of Maine. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment for neuropathy.

What Is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that leads to damage to the nerves in the body. Peripheral neuropathy, or neuropathy that affects your peripheral nervous system, usually occurs in the feet. Neuropathy can be triggered by a number of different causes. Such causes include diabetes, infections, cancers, disorders, and toxic substances.

Symptoms of Neuropathy Include:

  • Numbness
  • Sensation loss
  • Prickling and tingling sensations
  • Throbbing, freezing, burning pains
  • Muscle weakness

Those with diabetes are at serious risk due to being unable to feel an ulcer on their feet. Diabetics usually also suffer from poor blood circulation. This can lead to the wound not healing, infections occurring, and the limb may have to be amputated.

Treatment

To treat neuropathy in the foot, podiatrists will first diagnose the cause of the neuropathy. Figuring out the underlying cause of the neuropathy will allow the podiatrist to prescribe the best treatment, whether it be caused by diabetes, toxic substance exposure, infection, etc. If the nerve has not died, then it’s possible that sensation may be able to return to the foot.

Pain medication may be issued for pain. Electrical nerve stimulation can be used to stimulate nerves. If the neuropathy is caused from pressure on the nerves, then surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brunswick, Damariscotta, Augusta, ME. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Neuropathy

Children who frequently participate in running and jumping activities may complain about heel pain. It may be indicative of a condition that is referred to as Sever’s disease, which affects the growth plate in the heel. It may become irritated as a result of repetitive motions during specific sporting activities. Parents may notice that their child begins to walk with a limp, and the back of the heel may be swollen. It is beneficial to rest and elevate the affected foot, and it may help to relieve a portion of the pain when the calf muscles are stretched. If your active child complains of heel pain, it is advised that you schedule a consultation with a podiatrist who can properly diagnose and treat Sever’s disease.

Sever's disease often occurs in children and teens. If your child is experiencing foot or ankle pain, see one of our podiatrists from Foot & Ankle Associates of Maine. Our doctors can treat your child’s foot and ankle needs.

Sever’s Disease

Sever’s disease is also known as calcaneal apophysitis, which is a medical condition that causes heel pain I none or both feet. The disease is known to affect children between the ages of 8 and 14.

Sever’s disease occurs when part of the child’s heel known as the growth plate (calcaneal epiphysis) is attached to the Achilles tendon. This area can suffer injury when the muscles and tendons of the growing foot do not keep pace with bone growth. Therefore, the constant pain which one experiences at the back of the heel will make the child unable to put any weight on the heel. The child is then forced to walk on their toes.

Symptoms

Acute pain – Pain associated with Sever’s disease is usually felt in the heel when the child engages in physical activity such as walking, jumping and or running.

Highly active – Children who are very active are among the most susceptible in experiencing Sever’s disease, because of the stress and tension placed on their feet.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brunswick, Damariscotta, Augusta, ME. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle injuries.

Read more about Sever's Disease
Monday, 06 July 2020 00:00

What is a Heel Spur?

There are patients that develop a bony growth on their heel, and this may be referred to as a heel spur. A common symptom that is generally associated with this ailment can include pain and discomfort after arising in the morning. Research has indicated it can form in patients who have plantar fasciitis, which is an inflammation of the plantar fascia. Mild relief may be felt when the affected foot is taped, as this may help to provide extra support. Additionally, it can help to rest the foot as often as possible, and to lose existing weight in obese patients. In severe cases, a heel spur can be surgically removed. If you have heel pain that may indicate a heel spur, it is strongly advised that you consult with a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can determine what the best course of treatment is for you.

Heel spurs can be incredibly painful and sometimes may make you unable to participate in physical activities. To get medical care for your heel spurs, contact one of our podiatrists from Foot & Ankle Associates of Maine. Our doctors will do everything possible to treat your condition.

Heels Spurs

Heel spurs are formed by calcium deposits on the back of the foot where the heel is. This can also be caused by small fragments of bone breaking off one section of the foot, attaching onto the back of the foot. Heel spurs can also be bone growth on the back of the foot and may grow in the direction of the arch of the foot.

Older individuals usually suffer from heel spurs and pain sometimes intensifies with age. One of the main condition's spurs are related to is plantar fasciitis.

Pain

The pain associated with spurs is often because of weight placed on the feet. When someone is walking, their entire weight is concentrated on the feet. Bone spurs then have the tendency to affect other bones and tissues around the foot. As the pain continues, the feet will become tender and sensitive over time.

Treatments

There are many ways to treat heel spurs. If one is suffering from heel spurs in conjunction with pain, there are several methods for healing. Medication, surgery, and herbal care are some options.

If you have any questions feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brunswick, Damariscotta, Augusta, ME. We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technology to meet your needs.

Read more about Heel Spurs
Monday, 29 June 2020 00:00

Does My Child Have an Ingrown Toenail?

Common symptoms of ingrown toenails are redness and tenderness surrounding the edges of the nail. If your child complains of toenail pain, it may be indicative of an ingrown toenail. Additionally, there may be a discharge oozing if the nail has become infected, and it may cause severe pain and discomfort. This condition can be the result of trimming the toenails improperly, or from wearing shoes that do not have adequate room for the toes to move freely in. It may feel better when your child soaks the affected toe in warm water, as this may help to soften the skin. If you or your child has an ingrown toenail, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can offer the best treatment options.

Ingrown toenails can become painful if they are not treated properly. For more information about ingrown toenails, contact one of our podiatrists of Foot & Ankle Associates of Maine. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Ingrown Toenails

Ingrown toenails occur when a toenail grows sideways into the bed of the nail, causing pain, swelling, and possibly infection.

Causes

  • Bacterial infections
  • Improper nail cutting such as cutting it too short or not straight across
  • Trauma to the toe, such as stubbing, which causes the nail to grow back irregularly
  • Ill-fitting shoes that bunch the toes too close together
  • Genetic predisposition

Prevention

Because ingrown toenails are not something found outside of shoe-wearing cultures, going barefoot as often as possible will decrease the likeliness of developing ingrown toenails. Wearing proper fitting shoes and using proper cutting techniques will also help decrease your risk of developing ingrown toenails.

Treatment

Ingrown toenails are a very treatable foot condition. In minor cases, soaking the affected area in salt or antibacterial soaps will not only help with the ingrown nail itself, but also help prevent any infections from occurring. In more severe cases, surgery is an option. In either case, speaking to your podiatrist about this condition will help you get a better understanding of specific treatment options that are right for you.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brunswick, Damariscotta, Augusta, ME. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Ingrown Toenails
Wednesday, 24 June 2020 00:00

Wounds That Don't Heal Need to Be Checked

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Monday, 22 June 2020 00:00

Plantar Warts Are Caused by a Virus

Plantar warts develop on the bottom of the feet. They grow into the sole of the foot as pressure is endured from walking during the day, and can cause severe pain and discomfort. They appear as small, hardened areas, and may have black dots in the center. These develop as a result of blood vessels that grow inside the wart. Plantar warts are caused by a virus that lives and thrives in warm and moist environments. These types of places can include public swimming pools, shower room floors, and locker rooms. Patients who have a weakened immune system may be prone to getting plantar warts, in addition to people who have a history of developing this type of wart. It is suggested that you speak to a podiatrist if you have a plantar wart, who can determine what the best course of treatment is for you.

Plantar warts can be very uncomfortable. If you need your feet checked, contact one of our podiatrists from Foot & Ankle Associates of Maine. Our doctors will assist you with all of your foot and ankle needs.

About Plantar Warts

Plantar warts are the result of HPV, or human papillomavirus, getting into open wounds on the feet. They are mostly found on the heels or balls of the feet.

While plantar warts are generally harmless, those experiencing excessive pain or those suffering from diabetes or a compromised immune system require immediate medical care. Plantar warts are easily diagnosed, usually through scraping off a bit of rough skin or by getting a biopsy.

Symptoms

  • Lesions on the bottom of your feet, usually rough and grainy
  • Hard or thick callused spots
  • Wart seeds, which are small clotted blood vessels that look like little black spots
  • Pain, discomfort, or tenderness of your feet when walking or standing

Treatment

  • Freezing
  • Electric tool removal
  • Laser Treatment
  • Topical Creams (prescription only)
  • Over-the-counter medications

To help prevent developing plantar warts, avoid walking barefoot over abrasive surfaces that can cause cuts or wounds for HPV to get into. Avoiding direct contact with other warts, as well as not picking or rubbing existing warts, can help prevent the further spread of plantar warts. However, if you think you have developed plantar warts, speak to your podiatrist. He or she can diagnose the warts on your feet and recommend the appropriate treatment options.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Brunswick, Damariscotta, Augusta, ME. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about All About Plantar Warts
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